In a Crisis, Radio Should Be Bigger Than Ever — So Why Isn’t It?

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Lester
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In a Crisis, Radio Should Be Bigger Than Ever — So Why Isn’t It?

Post by Lester » Tue May 12, 2020 10:40 pm

Terrestrial music stations have a major cultural opportunity right now, but employees say a muddied strategy is standing in the way

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JKF18
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Re: In a Crisis, Radio Should Be Bigger Than Ever — So Why Isn’t It?

Post by JKF18 » Wed May 13, 2020 7:33 am

Agree with almost everything in the article.

Take a look at markets like Clarksburg where the ownership is now one conglomerate, and the other that runs on the cheap from Fairmont. A lone AM ESPN repeater that sounds like a phone line or is off a large portion of the time. 24/7 canned satellite formats took over in the mid 90s. Regional voicetracking from said conglomerate continues.

Even the a/c station went from local ownership to a duopoly with the CBS affiliate, to being sold to a religious broadcaster.

Same with WTBZ in Grafton - commercial to religious. Can small markets like Grafton, even support a commercial FM now?

What should be a news station is now broadcasted to stations up and down the dial, with repetitive information about Morgantown. Hint: not everyone in Elkins or Clarksburg cares about what is going on at WVU. That could be said for WDTV and WBOY's endless coverage about WVU as well. Not to mention the repetitive MetroNews programming. How many repeats of the statewide SportsLine are actually needed? Especially right now.

Just some thoughts to ponder.

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